Bobby Trivette’s Grave by Donna D. Vitucci #GuestPost #MagicMasterminds

When you slam the door shut on your boyfriend’s pleas you don’t expect to never see his beautiful face again.

A simple silly argument, you expect to get past it. You expect to love, fight, make up and love more. You’re young and there’s plenty of joy to come. But Bobby Trivette meets with a tragic accident in Kentucky’s back hills, and Dru Ann’s future turns to pure free fall.

Her grief spiral sets everyone connected to her evaluating the ones they love and the ways they’ve lived in this small town of Paris, Kentucky, forever in the shadow and the spirit of the Cane Ridge Shrine.

Because it was my first published novel, AT BOBBY TRIVETTE’S GRAVE holds a special place in my heart. This bookis about family, mystery, love and grief.

When you slam the door shut on your boyfriend’s pleas you don’t expect to never see him again. A simple silly argument, you expect to get past it. You expect to love, to fight, to make up and love some more. You’re young and there’s plenty of joy to come.

Bobby Trivette loves DruAnn Finch, boy loses girl, boy dies in a tragic accident in Kentucky’s back hills, but Bobby’s streak through the Finch family is only the beginning. Dru Ann’s future turns to pure free fall. Her grief spiral sets everyone connected to her evaluating the ones they love, their secrets and past ills, and the ways they’ve lived in the small town of Paris, Kentucky, forever in the shadow and the spirit of the Cane Ridge Shrine.

AT BOBBY TRIVETTE’S GRAVE is more than a teenage love story, more than starry-eyed DruAnn Finch and born-again Bobby Trivette fumbling through all the first-love drama that young people do. Bobby’s entrance and exit from the lives of the Finch family spurs an unraveling of secrets among the survivors. His death compels Dru’s mother, Bev, and her father, Reece, to confront secrets they’ve kept close as they try and help DruAnn through this tragic episode.

Reece’s youthful recklessness is mirrored, eerily, by Bobby’s short life, and the echoes force Reece into dealing with the secret he and his father have kept uneasily for the past twenty years. Bev will finally release the pain from a one-time instance from her past, which marked every decision of hers after. This story is, most of all, DruAnn’s, as she matures from a compliant, needy girlfriend to a young woman who banks on nobody other than herself. In moving past Bobby’s death, she will have to accept those she loves, in all their frailties, loved ones who are still walking wounded from tragedies that occurred long ago or near yesterday.

This story takes place in the small town of Paris, Kentucky, in the areas of Lexington and Georgetown, although fictional liberties have been taken with people, places/localities and events. The novel features a true landmark in the landscape of Bourbon County, the Cane Ridge Shrine, which encloses the Old Cane Ridge meeting House built in 1791. Cane Ridge was the site of a series of camp meetings in August, 1801, where an estimated 12,000 people congregated for six days of preaching, singing, dancing, swooning, and receiving the Holy Spirit. This was an important beginning to the Great Revival, called by some the Second Great Awakening, that swept the country and led to thousands of converts, a huge increase in the Methodist and Baptist churches, as well as creating new sects, most notably the Disciples of Christ. It’s this fire of the Holy Spirit, down through the ages, that captures Bobby’s imagination, although he’s a 21st century boy who conveniently mingles the spirit’s rapture with the desires of his body. Bobby and DruAnn retreat to Cane Ridge for their most private moments, and the place serves as the location where DruAnn will finally make peace with her loss.

Long before I wrote the novel, I had been walking with friends in a rural area of North Carolina where we came across an old family plot of sacred ground. One of the tombstones memorialized Bobby Trivette, and I vowed at that time to use the name somehow sometime in my work. I had no story, only a name. Years later, when I began to imagine who Bobby might be and how he’d met his end, I started creating circumstances, family, and relationships. I relied on a real-life instance to launch the book’s main secret. My mom had accidentally hit a child who had run into the street from between parked cars (everyone turned out okay). She’d been naturally quite shook up by the action, and I tried imagining what she must have felt like, being behind the wheel of an accident like that. This grew into DruAnn’s father, Reece’s, teenage hit-and-run secret, which sits at the center of the novel. If you’re curious as to how Bobby’s story dovetails with his, you’ll have to read the book.

Author Bio

Donna D. Vitucci has been writing forever, and has been publishing since 1990. Dozens of her stories, poems and creative non-fiction can be found in print and online. Her most recent novel, ALL SOULS (2018), is offered by Magic Masterminds Press, as are her previous 3 books, AT BOBBY TRIVETTE’S GRAVE, SALT OF PATRIOTS & IN EUPHORIA. Her work explores the ache and mistake of secrets among family, lovers and friends. A lifelong Midwesterner, she now lives in North Carolina, where she enjoys her cherished grandsons, and larger gardens than her former historic Covington townhouse could offer. Her recently completed novella, IMAGINE IMOGENE, is floating around the desks (or email inboxes) of those concentrated few who consider, and still champion, this middling form. Fingers crossed! You can read beginnings from her novels and selected published stories on her website.

Social Media

Website: http://www.magicmasterminds.com/donnavitucci

Twitter: @donnadvitucci

Facebook: @donnadvitucci  · Book

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